The Future Of The New York Times Ad Business Hinges On Video

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Michel Euler / AP Photo In this Oct. 4, 2013 photo shows Europe Editor of the International Herald Tribune Dick Stevenson, gestures as he speaks during an interview of the Associated Press at the headquarters of the International Herald Tribune in Paris, Oct. 4, 2013. The International Herald Tribune, a celebrated newspaper that long gave U.S. expatriates a cherished lifeline to events back home and a dose of Americana for foreign readers, published its last edition on Monday Oct. 14, 2013. The International Herald Tribune newspaper will be rebranded as the International New York Times on next Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013. Michel Euler / AP Photo In this Oct. 10, 2013 photo shows International Harald Tribune veteran Robert McCabe, who spent 22 years at the newspapers looks on the International Harald Tribune newspaper which was delivered at his home during an interview of the Associated Press in Paris. The International Herald Tribune, a celebrated newspaper that long gave U.S. expatriates a cherished lifeline to events back home and a dose of Americana for foreign readers, published its last edition on Monday Oct. 14, 2013. The International Herald Tribune newspaper will be rebranded as the International New York Times on next Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013.

New York Times goes global by rebranding IHT

“Video Revolution” is brought to you by Innovid. More posts in the series By the end of this month, The New York Times Company, which owns the newspaper of the same name and several peripheral media properties, will have a staff less than one quarter in size of the one it employed in 2002… according to the New York Times . As print newspaper readers have flocked to the internet over the past decade and change, the Times Company has been forced to sell off its holdings in other newspapers like The Boston Globe and web properties like about.com. The Times Company will consist primarily of the New York Times print and online publication, and the International New York Times, an integration of the New York Times and the Times Company’s old International Herald Tribune. One of the biggest issues the Times has had, as you might imagine, is finding ways to generate online revenues after spending the first century and a half of its existence focused almost entirely on the black-and-white newspaper product. Though the New York Times digital-only subscriptions have performed well since being introduced in March 2011 , print still makes up more than three quarters of the Times Company’s advertising and subscription businesses. In order to boost digital revenues and make up the more than $1 billion in annual advertising revenues the Times Company has lost since 2002, the Grey Lady is investing in online video. In March, the New York Times installed AOL/Huffington Post alum Rebecca Howard as general manager of its video department and in April, it expanded its advertising inventory by allowing online video, previously limited by a paywall, to be viewed by anyone who visited the site. Howard has since added 17 new staffers and is working to develop original series and needle-moving documentaries, like the one that debuted last month detailing Christine Quinn’s failed bid for New York City mayor . That documentary, 30 minutes in length, is preceded by a 30-second video advertisement for the Acura RLX. The move comes at a time when online publishing platforms are racing to grab their portions of the video advertising dollars that once went to television. According to a study released in August by the Interactive Advertising Bureau, 75% of U.S. senior executives think they will shift portions of the advertising money they once spent on television to digital video.

Airbnb host creates petition to confront New York lawmakers

(Credit: Screenshot by Donna Tam/CNET) Airbnb just got a few thousand more supporters in its ongoing dispute with New York state. The rent-out-your-home service has thrown its weight behind a petition authored by a New York City host named Mishelle. In the petition, she asks the state’s senate to fix what she calls a “poorly written law,” which could curb Airbnb’s reach in the region. “The reason this is happening is because of a poorly written law originally designed to stop slumlords from running illegal hotels with dozens of rental apartments,” Mishelle writes. “As a New Yorker just trying to pay my bills, I don’t understand why they think I’m a slumlord.” “I figure that if we get 20,000 people to sign the petition, we’ll get the state Senate’s attention,” she continues. “If we hit that goal by October 20th, I pledge to deliver the signatures to every senator myself.” As of this writing the petition has more than 18,500 signatures, the majority of which were gathered within the last 24 hours. Airbnb also got behind the petition on Monday by sending out an e-mail to its thousands of New York members. One member forwarded the e-mail to CNET. “The New York attorney general has subpoenaed the records of almost all of our New York hosts,” Airbnb’s global head of community Douglas Atkin wrote in the e-mail. “We are fighting the subpoena with all we’ve got, but poorly written laws make for even worse enforcement, and unless you help to stop it once and for all, the laws may never get better and New Yorkers will continue to suffer.” The debacle between New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and Airbnb has been ongoing over the past year, but it got heated when Schneiderman filed a subpoena earlier this month. The subpoena requests three years’ worth of data on thousands of Airbnb New York hosts. Airbnb has said that it has 225,000 community members in New York. The Attorney General’s Office is specifically looking for data on 15,000 hosts — it’s unclear if this includes almost all of Airbnb’s New York hosts.

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