Ford Makes Two More Suv Models For Russia

Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Ford makes two more SUV models for Russia Chris Woodyard, USA TODAY 1:47 p.m. EDT October 14, 2013 The automaker and its Russian partner will built Edge and EcoSports crossovers in Tatarstan A Ford EcoSport outside the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow (Photo: Ford) Ford will make EcoSport and Edge for the Russian market They will be built at plants in Russia Edge is sold in the U.S., but not EcoSport SHARE 6 CONNECT 8 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE Ford and its Russian partner says it is adding a pair of crossover SUVs to the list of vehicles it makes and sells in Russia. The Ford EcoSport SUV will be at the plant that Ford jointly runs with a Russian company called Sollers. Full production begins next year at the plant in Naberezhnye Chelny, Tatarstan. Ford will also bring its Edge crossover to a plant in Elabuga, Tatarstan. Edge is sold in the U.S. but not EcoSport, a smaller SUV. “The Ford EcoSport and Ford Edge, which have proved to be great successes around the world, will give Russian customers two new stylish, fun-to-drive options from Ford’s family of SUVs,” said Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford in a statement on a visit to Russia. Ford and Sollers are already making Ford Explorer SUVs in the Elabuga plant. They have also begun construction of a new $274 million engine plant in Tatarstan and a research center in Moscow. Find New & Used Cars

Russia says foils plot to attack chemical arms facility

View gallery Police officers detain a protester in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013. Police launched an arrest at subway station “Prague” where nationalists have called to gather citizens. Police stepped up patrols throughout the city on Tuesday to prevent a repeat of 2010 riots, when thousands of nationalists and soccer fans protested the killing of an ethnic Russian during a fight between soccer fans and men from the Caucasus. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin) MOSCOW (AP) Russian investigators say they have detained a suspect in the stabbing death of an ethnic Russian man that set off riots in Moscow in the past week. Russia’s Investigative Committee said in a statement Tuesday that a 30-year-old suspect named Orkhan Zeynalov, a native of the Caucasus nation of Azerbaijan, had been detained in a town outside Moscow. Investigators did not say what evidence pointed to his involvement in Saturday’s slaying. In addition, 50 people were detained by police Tuesday as they gathered to protest near the scene of Sunday’s riots. Tensions have long simmered between ethnic Russians and natives of the predominantly Muslim Caucasus region, who often work in Russia’s cities. Violent confrontations between the two groups have become more common in recent years. Politics & Government

Russia detains Azerbaijani over Moscow murder after riots

The suspected killer was caught just outside Moscow and sent for questioning by the Investigative Committee, the Russian equivalent of the FBI which oversees major criminal probes, a police spokesman told AFP. Police and investigators identified the suspect as Orkhan Zeinalov, a 30-year-old native of Azerbaijan. The press service of Moscow’s police department later issued a statement saying that Zeinalov had “confessed his guilt in unofficial conversations with members of the police.” Investigative Committee spokesman Vladimir Markin said Zeinalov had lived in Russia for the past 10 years and made a living as a taxi driver. “It is known that he is quick-tempered and aggressive, abuses alcohol and does not have a permanent place of residence in Moscow,” Markin said in a statement. Thousands rioted in southern Moscow on Sunday over the killing several days earlier of 25-year-old local man Yegor Shcherbakov, who was stabbed to death in front of his girlfriend. The killer fled the scene but images caught on surveillance cameras suggested he could have been from Central Asia or the Caucasus. After a largely peaceful protest on Saturday, the rioting erupted Sunday when more than 1,000 protesters attacked a wholesale vegetable market where they thought the suspected killer was hiding. After the weekend riots investigators combed the place, with Markin saying the search exposed “crude violations of migration, labour and administrative legislation” at the market. Authorities have decided to suspend trading at the market, the statement said, adding that investigators were considering opening a criminal probe against its management. Muscovites have for years chafed at the huge numbers of Muslim migrants who travel to the Russian capital in search of work. Police routinely raid underground operations in which migrants are exploited by employers but police themselves are notorious for extorting bribes from them.

Russia detains suspect in slaying linked to riots

Police officers detain a protester in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013. Police launched an arrest at subway station "Prague" where nationalists have called to gather citizens. Police stepped up patrols throughout the city on Tuesday to prevent a repeat of 2010 riots, when thousands of nationalists and soccer fans protested the killing of an ethnic Russian during a fight between soccer fans and men from the Caucasus. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin)

Authorities believe the suspects planned to build a bomb and attack the Maradykovsky chemical weapons storage and disposal facility in the Kirov region, about 1,000 km (620 miles) northeast of Moscow, the Federal Investigative Committee said. “The suspects planned a terrorist attack … that could have risked killing hundreds of people,” it said in a statement. It said the men had travelled north to the remote Kirov area from Moscow to plan the attack and it identified them as followers of Wahhabism – an ultra-conservative branch of Sunni Islam that is practised in Saudi Arabia and which has become a derogatory term for Islamist radicalism in Russia. Investigators found bomb components and “literature with extremist content” in an abandoned house in the area where the suspects, aged 19 and 21, were living, the committee said. It said the suspects were natives of the North Caucasus, a mountainous southern region not far from the Black Sea city of Sochi, where Russia hosts the 2014 Winter Olympics in February. The region is some 2,000 km (1,200 miles) from Kirov. Insurgent leader Doku Umarov, a Chechen, has urged fighters to use “maximum force” to stop the Olympics taking place. President Vladimir Putin has staked his reputation on the Games and ordered authorities to boost security in the North Caucasus, where the Islamist insurgency is rooted in two post-Soviet wars pitting Chechen separatists against the Kremlin. After suicide bombings that killed dozens in the Moscow subway in 2010 and at a Moscow airport in 2011, Umarov called for more attacks on infrastructure in the Russian heartland, but no other major attacks have occurred outside the North Caucasus. Russia inherited the Soviet Union’s declared stockpile of 40,000 metric tonnes of chemical weapons. In 1997 Moscow ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention, which requires member states to declare and dispose of all chemical weapons and production facilities. Russia and the United States had pledged to destroy their chemical arsenals by 2012 but both missed the deadline.

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